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Grabbers

Grabbers

Released 10 August 2012
Director Jon Wright
Starring







Richard Coyle, Ruth Bradley, Russell Tovey, Lalor Roddy, David Pearse, Bronagh Gallagher, Pascal Scott, Clelia Murphy, Louis Dempsey, Micheal O'Gruagain, Ned Dennehy, Stuart Graham, Killian Coyle, Michael Hough
Writer(s) Kevin Lehane
Producer(s)


Tracy Brimm, Eduardo Levy, James Martin, Kate Myers, Martina Niland, Piers Tempest
Origin Ireland, United Kingdom
Running Time 93 mintues
Genre Comedy, sci-fi, thriller
Rating 15A
100

Ten out of Ten Tentacles!

In a boozed-up b-movie that drinks its competitors under the table, when space squids assault a sleepy Irish island all hell breaks loose. The titular creatures, leviathan like space monsters, complete with coiled tendrils and a taste for human blood, encircle Erin Island and capitalise upon its perpetually rainy environs to haul themselves land-ho and strike terror into the unsuspecting villagers’ hearts. Displaying a terrifying range of impossibly different drunks types the island folk find the only solution is to stay magnificently sozzled thus making their blood provide a poisonous tipple to the vampiric sea urchins. In short, they all stand up, fall down, drunk, pissed, wankered and flootered in traditional Irish fashion.

With a wonderful ensemble cast that thankfully avoids the very real horror of imported stars with terrible cod Irish brogues, British born Richard Coyle gets it right as down-on-his-luck, booze addled, Garda Ciaran O'Shea, who, too fond of the local pub Mahers, greets every morning blearily. Ruth Bradley plays an overeager Dublin transfer to Erin Island, working as a straight-laced up-tight foil to O'Shea's easygoing parochial policeman. While Being Human's Russell Tovey as a proper marine biologist provides a possible love interest for Bradley's Garda Lisa Nolan and a lovable Lalor Roddy props up the bar as a hilarious poitín distilling old fella.

Grabbers has the essence of the genius formula that worked so well in Joe Dante's Gremlins, with a tongue/tentacle firmly wedged in its cheek, it mixes up a touch of Steven Spielberg, a dash of Roger Corman and a large helping of some very realistically wrought movie monsters, making it as familiar with comedy as it is replete with terror, thrills, romance and suspense. One of the funniest, drunkest, anarchic, action-packed Irish films to date and probably one of the only really successful Irish horrors ever!

- Cormac O’Brien