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Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse

Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse

Released 6 November 2015
Director Christopher Landon
Starring



Tye Sheridan, Halston Sage, Patrick Schwarzenegger, Logan Miller, Joey Morgan, Sarah Dumont, David Koechner
Writer(s)

Carrie Lee Wilson, Emi Mochizuki, Christopher Landon
Producer(s)

Bryan Brucks, Andy Fickman, Todd Garner, Besty Sullenger
Origin United States
Running Time 93 minutes
Genre Comedy, horror
Rating 15A
40

Braindead.

I'm not entirely sure about the wisdom of releasing Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse a week after Halloween. Instead of capitalising on the teenagers looking for a little midterm gore, Scouts Guide shuffles into screens as thoughts turn away from Trick or Treating and onto St. Nick. Strange.

The film itself is a very run of the mill zombie comedy that skews towards a younger crowd thanks to its preoccupation with breasts, both of the regular and zombie variety. Tye Sheridan plays Ben, a good natured guy who has been a member of his local scout group since he was young, alongside best friends Carter (Logan Miller) and Augie (Joey Morgan). As the boys head into Junior Year of high school, Ben is caught between party-loving Carter and dedicated Scout Augie, as he debates his dedication to the organisation. The outbreak of a zombie apocalypse makes the trio set their squabbles aside as they attempt to flee their town with the help of a shotgun toting cocktail waitress (Sarah Dumont).

The overwhelming feeling I had while watching Scouts Guide... was neither fear nor amusement but disappointed confusion; just how did Tye Sheridan end up here? The young actor showed tremendous potential in Joe (opposite an excellent Nicolas Cage) and Mud (with Matthew McConnaughey) and yet here he is, dangling out of a window clinging to the shrivelled penis of an OAP zombie. He deserves more than this puerile nonsense. As do the audience. Although there are a couple of pleasingly silly set pieces, mostly involving the hapless Augie, the preoccupation with toilet humour is a little trying. As is the fact that the women in the cast are little more than short shorts and cleavage.

While some sections of the audience may enjoy this gorey little piece of teen comedy, it is probably too dumb for most and I doubt even those who enjoy its brand of humour will find it particularly memorable. My advice to Tye Sheridan – find yourself a new agent.

- Linda O'Brien